Originally Posted By design-is-fine

design-is-fine:

Dodel-Port Atlas, botanical wall chart Volvox Globator, a species of green algae. The images were drawn by husband and wife team of Arnold and Carolina Dodel-Port. Arnold was a Swiss botanist who began composing these images in 1878. McGregor Museum, University of Auckland

design-is-fine:

Dodel-Port Atlas, botanical wall chart Volvox Globator, a species of green algae. The images were drawn by husband and wife team of Arnold and Carolina Dodel-Port. Arnold was a Swiss botanist who began composing these images in 1878. McGregor Museum, University of Auckland

(via scientificillustration)

Originally Posted By thelifeofapremed

thelifeofapremed:

Physical Sciences Periodic Table! Neat way of looking at and thinking about the periodic table

thelifeofapremed:

Physical Sciences Periodic Table! Neat way of looking at and thinking about the periodic table

Originally Posted By beatricebiologist

Originally Posted By ether927

aspiringdoctors:

ether927:

Incredible photos from the operating room taken by Max Aguilera-Hellweg in his book The Sacred Heart, An Atlas Of The Body Seen Through Invasive Surgery, 1997, Bulfinch Press, Little Brown & Company, New York  

https://www.behance.net/gallery/10516739/an-atlas-of-the-body

These are stunning.

He actually became an MD after shooting these photographs. 

Storytime: When I was in undergrad, a photography major who decided to try for med school after finishing sophomore year and had little to no guidance in this process, I did a project on his work. And then I contacted him on some photographer index type site (I don’t even know if it’s still there, this was in 2009, which feels like a million years ago in internet-time), but never expected to hear back. He messaged me back a week later saying, “Here is my phone number. Let me know when you’ll be calling so I can be sure to be by my phone.” I was floored. Here is someone who is not only one of the top photographers in the world, but also a physician, who has no idea who I am other than I have similar interests and questions, and offered to talk to me. On the phone.

I remember getting ready to call. I was so nervous. He answered, and was so incredibly friendly and patient. We talked about his journey, which was fascinating and very encouraging to me. At the time he had stopped practicing medicine to go back to photography. The thing I remember most is telling him how afraid I was. He told me that the way he kept himself going was that he imagined everything was for a specific person- so that pesky pathology or whatever was always for some future patient, and he couldn’t let them down just because he was tired or lonely or frustrated. Sometimes I do that too, it helps.

We never stayed in touch after that, but in the exceptionally unlikely event he reads this: Hey Mr. Augilera-Hellweg! Thanks for talking to me! I made it- I’m about to start my third year of med school.

Originally Posted By inarsvitae

inarsvitae:

I guess its my inner OCD coming out, but I’ve always been fascinated with Vacutainer blood collection tubes and their color coding system. I find it to be very organized and uniform and orderly and all these great, efficient things. The rainbow of tubes may be fun to look at, but do you know what each color means? Or why certain lab tests are done in certain color tubes? Below I’ve broken down most of the colors that are manufactured by the most ubiquitous company, BD. Every laboratory facility is different and blood-draw protocol varies widely, but what follows is only what I am familiar with at my specific facility. 
(In recommended order of draw)
Light Blue Top - Coagulation panels (PT/INR, PTT, Fibrinogen, Platelet assays)

Glass anti-coagulation tube - Contains a 3.5% sodium citrate solution which forms calcium salts in the blood, removing calcium ions and disrupting the clotting mechanism. These tubes can also be “CTAD” tubes, which contain sodium citrate, theophylline, adenosine and dipyridamol. The last three substances inhibit thrombocyte activation preventing artificial thrombocyte factors from coming into contact with the plasma and interfering with platelet factor assays.

Gold Top - Routine blood chemistry (Chem-7, metabolic panel, cholesterol) & endocrinology

Plastic serum separator tube - Contains a silica clot activator and a polymer gel, and is coated with silicone. The silicone coating prevents RBC’s from adhering to the wall of the tube. The clot activator accelerates the clotting of cells and fibrinogens to 30 minutes, and with the aid of the polymer gel, allows for separation of the blood serum from all other blood components after being centrifuged. 

 
Red & Grey Tiger Top - Infectious disease serology (HIV, Hepatitis, Mononucleosis, VDRL, Rubella)

Plastic serum separator tube - contains the exact same additives as a Gold top tube. My institution uses Red/Grey Tiger tops exclusively for dedicated tube, infectious testing/high priority labs, though these may also be used for routine chemistry. 

Red Top - Toxicology, therapeutic drug level monitoring, antibody & immunology

Glass serum tube - NO polymer gel separator or clotting additive. Used for sensitive serum tests where tube additives may interfere with measured levels. 

Orange Top - STAT/Emergency Serum tests (Troponin, B-HCG, Creatinine, etc.)

Plastic rapid serum tube - newly marketed as “the speed of plasma, the quality of serum,” this tube contains a thrombin-based clot activator and a polymer separating gel. The blood sample clots in as little as 5 minutes in this tube and the serum can be separated quickly in a centrifuge. Aimed at critical care patients where rapid results mean the difference in care decisions.

Light Green Top - STAT chemistry panel

Plastic plasma separator tube - contains lithium heparin to prevent clotting as well as a polymer separating gel to extract blood plasma after centrifuging. Often used in acute care for a STAT chem-7/electrolyte panel. 

Dark Green Top - Plasma testing (ammonia, HLA’s, globins, cytogenetics, amino acids)

Plastic plasma tube - spray coated with sodium heparin to stop thrombin in the coagulation cascade. 

Lavender Top - Whole blood hematology (CBC w/Diff, ESR, A1C, platelets,)

Plastic whole blood tube - Spray coated with K(2)-EDTA - Ethylenediaminetetracetic acid.  EDTA functions by binding calcium in the blood and keeping the blood from clotting without interfering with whole blood products. 

Pink Top - Blood banking (Type & Screen, Crossmatch, Coombs)

Plastic whole blood tube - Contains the same EDTA spray coat as Lavender top, except many institutions have moved towards using this whole blood tube exclusively for the blood bank laboratory. Designed for use with the special pink crossmatch patient information label required by the American Association of Blood Banks.  

Pearl White Top - DNA PCR (Adenovirus, Toxoplasma, HHV-6 etc.)

Plastic Plasma Preparation Tube - For use in molecular diagnostic test methods such as polymerase chain reaction [PCR] and/or branched DNA [bDNA] amplification techniques. Contains spray coated K(2) EDTA for cell anticoagulation and a polymer gel for plasma separation. 

Grey Top - Lactate & Glucose

Plastic plasma tube - Contains a glycolytic inhibitor, sodium fluoride, to preserve plasma concentrations of lactate and glucose for up to 24 hours until testing can be performed on the sample. Also contains the anticoagulant potassium oxalate, which binds calcium and prevents the clotting mechanism. 

Other less-used tubes:
Tan Top - Lead levels

Plastic plasma tube - Contains K(2)-EDTA for anticoagulation and is is certified by the manufacturer to contain less than .01 µg/mL(ppm) lead for accurate and sensitive lead level determinations.

Royal Blue Top - Trace element & nutritional levels (Copper, Zinc, Arsenic, Mercury, etc.)

Plastic serum tube - For trace-element, toxicology, and nutritional-chemistry determinations. The manufacturer certifies the special plastic stopper formulation provides low levels of trace elements which will not interfere with laboratory results. 

Yellow Top - Tissue/HLA phenotyping, Flow cytometry, DNA plasmapheresis (paternity testing)

Glass whole blood tube - Known as an ACD-A tube, contains trisodium citrate, citric acid and dextrose in water, which is mainly used as an anticoagulant to preserve blood specimens for sensitive molecular testing and tissue typing. 


I find this all so interesting!

inarsvitae:

I guess its my inner OCD coming out, but I’ve always been fascinated with Vacutainer blood collection tubes and their color coding system. I find it to be very organized and uniform and orderly and all these great, efficient things. The rainbow of tubes may be fun to look at, but do you know what each color means? Or why certain lab tests are done in certain color tubes? Below I’ve broken down most of the colors that are manufactured by the most ubiquitous company, BD. Every laboratory facility is different and blood-draw protocol varies widely, but what follows is only what I am familiar with at my specific facility. 

(In recommended order of draw)

Light Blue Top - Coagulation panels (PT/INR, PTT, Fibrinogen, Platelet assays)

Glass anti-coagulation tube - Contains a 3.5% sodium citrate solution which forms calcium salts in the blood, removing calcium ions and disrupting the clotting mechanism. These tubes can also be “CTAD” tubes, which contain sodium citrate, theophylline, adenosine and dipyridamol. The last three substances inhibit thrombocyte activation preventing artificial thrombocyte factors from coming into contact with the plasma and interfering with platelet factor assays.

Gold Top - Routine blood chemistry (Chem-7, metabolic panel, cholesterol) & endocrinology

Plastic serum separator tube - Contains a silica clot activator and a polymer gel, and is coated with silicone. The silicone coating prevents RBC’s from adhering to the wall of the tube. The clot activator accelerates the clotting of cells and fibrinogens to 30 minutes, and with the aid of the polymer gel, allows for separation of the blood serum from all other blood components after being centrifuged. 

 

Red & Grey Tiger Top - Infectious disease serology (HIV, Hepatitis, Mononucleosis, VDRL, Rubella)

Plastic serum separator tube - contains the exact same additives as a Gold top tube. My institution uses Red/Grey Tiger tops exclusively for dedicated tube, infectious testing/high priority labs, though these may also be used for routine chemistry. 

Red Top - Toxicology, therapeutic drug level monitoring, antibody & immunology

Glass serum tube - NO polymer gel separator or clotting additive. Used for sensitive serum tests where tube additives may interfere with measured levels. 

Orange Top - STAT/Emergency Serum tests (Troponin, B-HCG, Creatinine, etc.)

Plastic rapid serum tube - newly marketed as “the speed of plasma, the quality of serum,” this tube contains a thrombin-based clot activator and a polymer separating gel. The blood sample clots in as little as 5 minutes in this tube and the serum can be separated quickly in a centrifuge. Aimed at critical care patients where rapid results mean the difference in care decisions.

Light Green Top - STAT chemistry panel

Plastic plasma separator tube - contains lithium heparin to prevent clotting as well as a polymer separating gel to extract blood plasma after centrifuging. Often used in acute care for a STAT chem-7/electrolyte panel. 

Dark Green Top - Plasma testing (ammonia, HLA’s, globins, cytogenetics, amino acids)

Plastic plasma tube - spray coated with sodium heparin to stop thrombin in the coagulation cascade. 

Lavender Top - Whole blood hematology (CBC w/Diff, ESR, A1C, platelets,)

Plastic whole blood tube - Spray coated with K(2)-EDTA - Ethylenediaminetetracetic acid.  EDTA functions by binding calcium in the blood and keeping the blood from clotting without interfering with whole blood products. 

Pink Top - Blood banking (Type & Screen, Crossmatch, Coombs)

Plastic whole blood tube - Contains the same EDTA spray coat as Lavender top, except many institutions have moved towards using this whole blood tube exclusively for the blood bank laboratory. Designed for use with the special pink crossmatch patient information label required by the American Association of Blood Banks.  

Pearl White Top - DNA PCR (Adenovirus, Toxoplasma, HHV-6 etc.)

Plastic Plasma Preparation Tube - For use in molecular diagnostic test methods such as polymerase chain reaction [PCR] and/or branched DNA [bDNA] amplification techniques. Contains spray coated K(2) EDTA for cell anticoagulation and a polymer gel for plasma separation. 

Grey Top - Lactate & Glucose

Plastic plasma tube - Contains a glycolytic inhibitor, sodium fluoride, to preserve plasma concentrations of lactate and glucose for up to 24 hours until testing can be performed on the sample. Also contains the anticoagulant potassium oxalate, which binds calcium and prevents the clotting mechanism. 

Other less-used tubes:

Tan Top - Lead levels

Plastic plasma tube - Contains K(2)-EDTA for anticoagulation and is is certified by the manufacturer to contain less than .01 µg/mL(ppm) lead for accurate and sensitive lead level determinations.

Royal Blue Top - Trace element & nutritional levels (Copper, Zinc, Arsenic, Mercury, etc.)

Plastic serum tube - For trace-element, toxicology, and nutritional-chemistry determinations. The manufacturer certifies the special plastic stopper formulation provides low levels of trace elements which will not interfere with laboratory results. 

Yellow Top - Tissue/HLA phenotyping, Flow cytometry, DNA plasmapheresis (paternity testing)

Glass whole blood tube - Known as an ACD-A tube, contains trisodium citrate, citric acid and dextrose in water, which is mainly used as an anticoagulant to preserve blood specimens for sensitive molecular testing and tissue typing. 

I find this all so interesting!

(via adenosinetriesphosphate)

Originally Posted By swing-lifeeee-away

charlesoberonn:

lewishaoki:

warcalledlife:

Not sure why but this is how my phone took a picture of lightning

Looks like it took half of this world, and half of a dark world.
It’s so rad and creepy, gives the spook chills

Science side here: The flash coming off of the lightning is very fast. Your phonecamera’s shutter actually takes the photo from side to side. The flash of lightning (or perhaps another lightning) struck while it was in the middle of photographing, leaving half of the photo being from before the flash, and the other half during it.

charlesoberonn:

lewishaoki:

warcalledlife:

Not sure why but this is how my phone took a picture of lightning

Looks like it took half of this world, and half of a dark world.

It’s so rad and creepy, gives the spook chills

Science side here: The flash coming off of the lightning is very fast. Your phonecamera’s shutter actually takes the photo from side to side. The flash of lightning (or perhaps another lightning) struck while it was in the middle of photographing, leaving half of the photo being from before the flash, and the other half during it.

(Source: swing-lifeeee-away, via caudaequina)

Originally Posted By i-heart-histo

thenotquitedoctor:

aspiringdoctors:

i-heart-histo:

Once upon a slide…the first microbiology book for 5 year olds!

At last! No more bed time fairy tales about damsels in distress, princesses in pink and knights in white shining armor.

Move over Disney. This is a world we should be opening our kids up to. Steeped in reality. A world 1000x more exciting than those lands too far far far away, and it is all playing out under our very noses, inside our refrigerators, outside our back doors and throughout our own bodies.

Thank you to Nicola Davies (author) and Emily Sutton (illustrator) for this beautiful non-fiction children’s book that introduces young readers to microscopy.

I can’t wait to buy this for my nieces.

Let me know if you need help with the histological sequel ;)

i-heart-histo

Sources:

View more of Emily’s beautiful artwork at her website

Find out more about award winning author Nicola at her blog/website

Images and book (ISBN:1406341045) seen at amazon.com and via Walker Books 

 I need this for my unconceived spawn.

I must have this!

(via mistressofsurgery)

Originally Posted By for-science-sake

Cell Size and Scale 
The relative sizes of what cant be seen with the naked eye. 

Source To see all animations and sizes check out the website! 
VIA that-science-bitch:

(Source: , via biovisual)

Originally Posted By moshita

moshita:

How the Brain Benefits from Being Bilingual – Infographic

The brain benefits immensely from speaking two or more languages from improved cognitive skills, to developing denser grey matter, to improved decision making skills, and even delaying the onset of dementia. Bilingualism improves children’s test scores and critical thinking abilities, as well as concentration and multi-tasking abilities. Speaking two languages also means a better salary in the workforce across a wide array of professions. View the below infographic for more information on the subject.

bhlingual

Originally Posted By

serenastyle:

fuckyeahstarwars:

This just might be too geeky even for me.

HAAAAAAAAAAH. First thing you learn in 8th grade physics.

(via )

serenastyle:

fuckyeahstarwars:

This just might be too geeky even for me.

HAAAAAAAAAAH. First thing you learn in 8th grade physics.

(via )

Originally Posted By staceythinx

hopefulnursing:

staceythinx:

Micrographs by Josefine Stenddy 

The human anatomy is living art.

I was never the biggest fan of my histology course overall, but I did find the images to be amazing. Always a fan of microscopy.

(via adenosinetriesphosphate)

Originally Posted By scienceyoucanlove

scienceyoucanlove:

Great women of science Rosalind Franklin (1920-1958) - British biophysicist and X-ray crystallographer who made critical contributions to the understanding of the fine molecular structures of DNA, RNA, viruses, coal, and graphite. Marie Skłodowska-Curie (1867-1934) - Polish and naturalized-French physicist and chemist, famous for her pioneering research on radioactivity. Chien-Shiung Wu (1912-1997) - Chinese American physicist with expertise in the techniques of experimental physics and radioactivity. Émilie du Châtelet (1706-1749) - French mathematician, physicist, and author during the Age of Enlightenment.Mae Jemison (1956) - American physician and NASA astronaut. She became the first African American woman to travel in space when she went into orbit aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour on September 12, 1992.Vera Rubin (1928) - American astronomer who pioneered work on galaxy rotation rates. She is famous for uncovering the discrepancy between the predicted angular motion of galaxies and the observed motion, by studying galactic rotation curves. Ada Lovelace (1815-1852) - English mathematician and writer chiefly known for her work on Charles Babbage’s early mechanical general-purpose computer, the Analytical Engine. Her notes on the engine include what is recognised as the first algorithm intended to be processed by a machine. Because of this, she is often described as the world’s first computer programmer.
read more

scienceyoucanlove:

Great women of science 

Rosalind Franklin (1920-1958) - British biophysicist and X-ray crystallographer who made critical contributions to the understanding of the fine molecular structures of DNA, RNA, viruses, coal, and graphite. 

Marie Skłodowska-Curie (1867-1934) - Polish and naturalized-French physicist and chemist, famous for her pioneering research on radioactivity. 

Chien-Shiung Wu (1912-1997) - Chinese American physicist with expertise in the techniques of experimental physics and radioactivity. 

Émilie du Châtelet (1706-1749) - French mathematician, physicist, and author during the Age of Enlightenment.

Mae Jemison (1956) - American physician and NASA astronaut. She became the first African American woman to travel in space when she went into orbit aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour on September 12, 1992.

Vera Rubin (1928) - American astronomer who pioneered work on galaxy rotation rates. She is famous for uncovering the discrepancy between the predicted angular motion of galaxies and the observed motion, by studying galactic rotation curves. 

Ada Lovelace (1815-1852) - English mathematician and writer chiefly known for her work on Charles Babbage’s early mechanical general-purpose computer, the Analytical Engine. Her notes on the engine include what is recognised as the first algorithm intended to be processed by a machine. Because of this, she is often described as the world’s first computer programmer.

read more

(via scientificillustration)

Originally Posted By posinginpink

Science + fashion!!!

Science + fashion!!!

(Source: posinginpink, via scientificillustration)

Originally Posted By hydrogeneportfolio

beatonna:

hydrogeneportfolio:

Minimal Posters - Six Women Who Changed Science. And The World.

Yeah yeaaa, lemme go back in time and put these posters on my wall when I was 10!

Thanks sethasfishman for showing me this!

(via caudaequina)

Originally Posted By rocket-skaytes

thecraftychemist:

A rainbow of urine from a hospital lab, photographed by laboratory scientist Heather West. 

None of the urine samples were treated with chemicals in the lab to change their hue, West said. “When I posted the picture [on Flickr], people thought that we did something magical to it. They did not believe it was actually urine,” she said.
What the colors indicate:
Red
Blood is the most common cause of red urine, and is a definite health warning signal. “As a urologist, I’m always worried when people have red urine,” Greene said. Bladder cancer, infections and kidney stones can all cause bleeding that shows up in urine, and all are worth a trip to the doctor. More benignly, eating a lot of beets can turn your pee pink.
Orange
Dark-colored urine also points to health problems. Liver cancer can cause dark brown urine, containing excess bilirubin, a brownish pigment produced by the liver.
A drug called phenazopyridine (Pyridium) created the bright orange urine seen in West’s photograph. It’s a painkiller given to people with urinary tract infections, and converts pee into a Gatorade-like color.
Antibiotics often alter urine color to orange, Green said. People who eat enough carrots to turn their skin orange can have orange pee, too, she added.
Yellow
Many people have seen the effects of dehydration on pee — a dark yellow- colored urine. Without enough water, a pigment called urochrome becomes more concentrated in urine.
On the other hand, in hospitals, some patients on intravenous fluids are so hydrated they produce nearly colorless urine, West said. The cloudy, yellow urine in West’s picture was caused by an infection.
Green
Green urine usually flows from dilution of blue urine, as in West’s image. Occasionally, a urinary tract infection may trigger green pee.
Blue
The rarest of all on the pee rainbow, blue urine often comes from chemicals and drugs given to patients. The No. 1 offender is a drug called methylene blue, used to treat carbon monoxide poisoning, and as a dye during surgery. It makes the blue and green urine seen in West’s photograph.
Methylene blue was also a malaria treatment during World War II. Other medications that make blue urine include Viagra, indomethacin and propofol — the anesthetic drug infamously linked with Michael Jackson’s death.
Genetic conditions that affect the breakdown of dietary nutrients can also cause blue urine. Even blue food dyes sometimes passes into pee.
Indigo and Violet
In this photo, the deep purple urine comes from a patient with kidney failure. “The dark black one is something that you usually see in kidney failure,” West said. “Your kidneys should be filtering your blood and getting rid of your waste, and when you damage the kidneys, there’s a lot more blood [in the urine],” she said.
Another violet venue: Patients with catheters can develop a rare complication called “purple urine bag syndrome,” linked to a urinary tract infection and highly alkaline urine. A genetic condition called porphyria may also trigger deep purple pee.

Source

thecraftychemist:

A rainbow of urine from a hospital lab, photographed by laboratory scientist Heather West.

None of the urine samples were treated with chemicals in the lab to change their hue, West said. “When I posted the picture [on Flickr], people thought that we did something magical to it. They did not believe it was actually urine,” she said.

What the colors indicate:

  • Red

Blood is the most common cause of red urine, and is a definite health warning signal. “As a urologist, I’m always worried when people have red urine,” Greene said. Bladder cancer, infections and kidney stones can all cause bleeding that shows up in urine, and all are worth a trip to the doctor. More benignly, eating a lot of beets can turn your pee pink.

  • Orange

Dark-colored urine also points to health problems. Liver cancer can cause dark brown urine, containing excess bilirubin, a brownish pigment produced by the liver.

A drug called phenazopyridine (Pyridium) created the bright orange urine seen in West’s photograph. It’s a painkiller given to people with urinary tract infections, and converts pee into a Gatorade-like color.

Antibiotics often alter urine color to orange, Green said. People who eat enough carrots to turn their skin orange can have orange pee, too, she added.

  • Yellow

Many people have seen the effects of dehydration on pee — a dark yellow- colored urine. Without enough water, a pigment called urochrome becomes more concentrated in urine.

On the other hand, in hospitals, some patients on intravenous fluids are so hydrated they produce nearly colorless urine, West said. The cloudy, yellow urine in West’s picture was caused by an infection.

  • Green

Green urine usually flows from dilution of blue urine, as in West’s image. Occasionally, a urinary tract infection may trigger green pee.

  • Blue

The rarest of all on the pee rainbow, blue urine often comes from chemicals and drugs given to patients. The No. 1 offender is a drug called methylene blue, used to treat carbon monoxide poisoning, and as a dye during surgery. It makes the blue and green urine seen in West’s photograph.

Methylene blue was also a malaria treatment during World War II. Other medications that make blue urine include Viagra, indomethacin and propofol — the anesthetic drug infamously linked with Michael Jackson’s death.

Genetic conditions that affect the breakdown of dietary nutrients can also cause blue urine. Even blue food dyes sometimes passes into pee.

  • Indigo and Violet

In this photo, the deep purple urine comes from a patient with kidney failure. “The dark black one is something that you usually see in kidney failure,” West said. “Your kidneys should be filtering your blood and getting rid of your waste, and when you damage the kidneys, there’s a lot more blood [in the urine],” she said.

Another violet venue: Patients with catheters can develop a rare complication called “purple urine bag syndrome,” linked to a urinary tract infection and highly alkaline urine. A genetic condition called porphyria may also trigger deep purple pee.

Source

(via beyondtheoath)

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