Originally Posted By moshita

moshita:

How the Brain Benefits from Being Bilingual – Infographic

The brain benefits immensely from speaking two or more languages from improved cognitive skills, to developing denser grey matter, to improved decision making skills, and even delaying the onset of dementia. Bilingualism improves children’s test scores and critical thinking abilities, as well as concentration and multi-tasking abilities. Speaking two languages also means a better salary in the workforce across a wide array of professions. View the below infographic for more information on the subject.

bhlingual

Originally Posted By

serenastyle:

fuckyeahstarwars:

This just might be too geeky even for me.

HAAAAAAAAAAH. First thing you learn in 8th grade physics.

(via )

serenastyle:

fuckyeahstarwars:

This just might be too geeky even for me.

HAAAAAAAAAAH. First thing you learn in 8th grade physics.

(via )

Originally Posted By staceythinx

hopefulnursing:

staceythinx:

Micrographs by Josefine Stenddy 

The human anatomy is living art.

I was never the biggest fan of my histology course overall, but I did find the images to be amazing. Always a fan of microscopy.

(via adenosinetriesphosphate)

Originally Posted By scienceyoucanlove

scienceyoucanlove:

Great women of science Rosalind Franklin (1920-1958) - British biophysicist and X-ray crystallographer who made critical contributions to the understanding of the fine molecular structures of DNA, RNA, viruses, coal, and graphite. Marie Skłodowska-Curie (1867-1934) - Polish and naturalized-French physicist and chemist, famous for her pioneering research on radioactivity. Chien-Shiung Wu (1912-1997) - Chinese American physicist with expertise in the techniques of experimental physics and radioactivity. Émilie du Châtelet (1706-1749) - French mathematician, physicist, and author during the Age of Enlightenment.Mae Jemison (1956) - American physician and NASA astronaut. She became the first African American woman to travel in space when she went into orbit aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour on September 12, 1992.Vera Rubin (1928) - American astronomer who pioneered work on galaxy rotation rates. She is famous for uncovering the discrepancy between the predicted angular motion of galaxies and the observed motion, by studying galactic rotation curves. Ada Lovelace (1815-1852) - English mathematician and writer chiefly known for her work on Charles Babbage’s early mechanical general-purpose computer, the Analytical Engine. Her notes on the engine include what is recognised as the first algorithm intended to be processed by a machine. Because of this, she is often described as the world’s first computer programmer.
read more

scienceyoucanlove:

Great women of science 

Rosalind Franklin (1920-1958) - British biophysicist and X-ray crystallographer who made critical contributions to the understanding of the fine molecular structures of DNA, RNA, viruses, coal, and graphite. 

Marie Skłodowska-Curie (1867-1934) - Polish and naturalized-French physicist and chemist, famous for her pioneering research on radioactivity. 

Chien-Shiung Wu (1912-1997) - Chinese American physicist with expertise in the techniques of experimental physics and radioactivity. 

Émilie du Châtelet (1706-1749) - French mathematician, physicist, and author during the Age of Enlightenment.

Mae Jemison (1956) - American physician and NASA astronaut. She became the first African American woman to travel in space when she went into orbit aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour on September 12, 1992.

Vera Rubin (1928) - American astronomer who pioneered work on galaxy rotation rates. She is famous for uncovering the discrepancy between the predicted angular motion of galaxies and the observed motion, by studying galactic rotation curves. 

Ada Lovelace (1815-1852) - English mathematician and writer chiefly known for her work on Charles Babbage’s early mechanical general-purpose computer, the Analytical Engine. Her notes on the engine include what is recognised as the first algorithm intended to be processed by a machine. Because of this, she is often described as the world’s first computer programmer.

read more

(via scientificillustration)

Originally Posted By posinginpink

Science + fashion!!!

Science + fashion!!!

(Source: posinginpink, via scientificillustration)

Originally Posted By hydrogeneportfolio

beatonna:

hydrogeneportfolio:

Minimal Posters - Six Women Who Changed Science. And The World.

Yeah yeaaa, lemme go back in time and put these posters on my wall when I was 10!

Thanks sethasfishman for showing me this!

(via caudaequina)

Originally Posted By rocket-skaytes

thecraftychemist:

A rainbow of urine from a hospital lab, photographed by laboratory scientist Heather West. 

None of the urine samples were treated with chemicals in the lab to change their hue, West said. “When I posted the picture [on Flickr], people thought that we did something magical to it. They did not believe it was actually urine,” she said.
What the colors indicate:
Red
Blood is the most common cause of red urine, and is a definite health warning signal. “As a urologist, I’m always worried when people have red urine,” Greene said. Bladder cancer, infections and kidney stones can all cause bleeding that shows up in urine, and all are worth a trip to the doctor. More benignly, eating a lot of beets can turn your pee pink.
Orange
Dark-colored urine also points to health problems. Liver cancer can cause dark brown urine, containing excess bilirubin, a brownish pigment produced by the liver.
A drug called phenazopyridine (Pyridium) created the bright orange urine seen in West’s photograph. It’s a painkiller given to people with urinary tract infections, and converts pee into a Gatorade-like color.
Antibiotics often alter urine color to orange, Green said. People who eat enough carrots to turn their skin orange can have orange pee, too, she added.
Yellow
Many people have seen the effects of dehydration on pee — a dark yellow- colored urine. Without enough water, a pigment called urochrome becomes more concentrated in urine.
On the other hand, in hospitals, some patients on intravenous fluids are so hydrated they produce nearly colorless urine, West said. The cloudy, yellow urine in West’s picture was caused by an infection.
Green
Green urine usually flows from dilution of blue urine, as in West’s image. Occasionally, a urinary tract infection may trigger green pee.
Blue
The rarest of all on the pee rainbow, blue urine often comes from chemicals and drugs given to patients. The No. 1 offender is a drug called methylene blue, used to treat carbon monoxide poisoning, and as a dye during surgery. It makes the blue and green urine seen in West’s photograph.
Methylene blue was also a malaria treatment during World War II. Other medications that make blue urine include Viagra, indomethacin and propofol — the anesthetic drug infamously linked with Michael Jackson’s death.
Genetic conditions that affect the breakdown of dietary nutrients can also cause blue urine. Even blue food dyes sometimes passes into pee.
Indigo and Violet
In this photo, the deep purple urine comes from a patient with kidney failure. “The dark black one is something that you usually see in kidney failure,” West said. “Your kidneys should be filtering your blood and getting rid of your waste, and when you damage the kidneys, there’s a lot more blood [in the urine],” she said.
Another violet venue: Patients with catheters can develop a rare complication called “purple urine bag syndrome,” linked to a urinary tract infection and highly alkaline urine. A genetic condition called porphyria may also trigger deep purple pee.

Source

thecraftychemist:

A rainbow of urine from a hospital lab, photographed by laboratory scientist Heather West.

None of the urine samples were treated with chemicals in the lab to change their hue, West said. “When I posted the picture [on Flickr], people thought that we did something magical to it. They did not believe it was actually urine,” she said.

What the colors indicate:

  • Red

Blood is the most common cause of red urine, and is a definite health warning signal. “As a urologist, I’m always worried when people have red urine,” Greene said. Bladder cancer, infections and kidney stones can all cause bleeding that shows up in urine, and all are worth a trip to the doctor. More benignly, eating a lot of beets can turn your pee pink.

  • Orange

Dark-colored urine also points to health problems. Liver cancer can cause dark brown urine, containing excess bilirubin, a brownish pigment produced by the liver.

A drug called phenazopyridine (Pyridium) created the bright orange urine seen in West’s photograph. It’s a painkiller given to people with urinary tract infections, and converts pee into a Gatorade-like color.

Antibiotics often alter urine color to orange, Green said. People who eat enough carrots to turn their skin orange can have orange pee, too, she added.

  • Yellow

Many people have seen the effects of dehydration on pee — a dark yellow- colored urine. Without enough water, a pigment called urochrome becomes more concentrated in urine.

On the other hand, in hospitals, some patients on intravenous fluids are so hydrated they produce nearly colorless urine, West said. The cloudy, yellow urine in West’s picture was caused by an infection.

  • Green

Green urine usually flows from dilution of blue urine, as in West’s image. Occasionally, a urinary tract infection may trigger green pee.

  • Blue

The rarest of all on the pee rainbow, blue urine often comes from chemicals and drugs given to patients. The No. 1 offender is a drug called methylene blue, used to treat carbon monoxide poisoning, and as a dye during surgery. It makes the blue and green urine seen in West’s photograph.

Methylene blue was also a malaria treatment during World War II. Other medications that make blue urine include Viagra, indomethacin and propofol — the anesthetic drug infamously linked with Michael Jackson’s death.

Genetic conditions that affect the breakdown of dietary nutrients can also cause blue urine. Even blue food dyes sometimes passes into pee.

  • Indigo and Violet

In this photo, the deep purple urine comes from a patient with kidney failure. “The dark black one is something that you usually see in kidney failure,” West said. “Your kidneys should be filtering your blood and getting rid of your waste, and when you damage the kidneys, there’s a lot more blood [in the urine],” she said.

Another violet venue: Patients with catheters can develop a rare complication called “purple urine bag syndrome,” linked to a urinary tract infection and highly alkaline urine. A genetic condition called porphyria may also trigger deep purple pee.

Source

(via beyondtheoath)

Originally Posted By misbehavedscientist

misbehavedscientist:

It’s officially December, so have a fungal Christmas tree. Top: Talaromyces stipitatus; Tree: Aspergillus nidulans; Ornaments: Penicillium marneffei; Trunk: Aspergillus terreus.

misbehavedscientist:

It’s officially December, so have a fungal Christmas tree. Top: Talaromyces stipitatus; Tree: Aspergillus nidulans; Ornaments: Penicillium marneffei; Trunk: Aspergillus terreus.

(via thescienceblog)

Originally Posted By compoundfractur

compoundfractur:

This heart has been “decellularized;” the cells have been removed via chemical infusion, leaving the cellular scaffolding in place. That’s all protein and connective tissue.

compoundfractur:

This heart has been “decellularized;” the cells have been removed via chemical infusion, leaving the cellular scaffolding in place. That’s all protein and connective tissue.

Originally Posted By ediblefungi

ediblefungi:

ILLUSTRATED BY MELISSA GARDEN

Originally Posted By scienceyoucanlove

scienceyoucanlove:

 
Image by Dr Jon Heras 
An illustration of the progression of angiogenesis, which is the physiological process involving the growth of new blood vessels from pre-existing vessels. Tumours cannot grow beyond a few mm due to a lack of oxygen and other nutrients, so they encourage the formation of blood vessels to support their rapid cell division. For this reason, angiogenesis is a fundamental step in the transition of tumors from a dormant state to a malignant one.

scienceyoucanlove:

 

Image by Dr Jon Heras 

An illustration of the progression of angiogenesis, which is the physiological process involving the growth of new blood vessels from pre-existing vessels. Tumours cannot grow beyond a few mm due to a lack of oxygen and other nutrients, so they encourage the formation of blood vessels to support their rapid cell division. For this reason, angiogenesis is a fundamental step in the transition of tumors from a dormant state to a malignant one.

(via scientificillustration)

Originally Posted By expose-the-light

thisfuturemd:

expose-the-light:

Henrietta Lacks’ ‘Immortal’ Cells

A Microscopic View of Henrietta Lacks’ ‘Immortal’ Cells

HeLa cells were the first immortal human cells ever grown in culture and are invaluable to medical researchers

In the image:

1. A HeLa cancer cell dividing.

2. The metaphase stage of a human HeLa cell division.

3. Subspecies of HeLa cells have evolved in labs and some feel that the cell line is no longer human, but a new microbial life form. These cells are shown in green the cytoplasm is red and structures within the cytoplasm are blue.

4. The prophase stage of mitosis in the division of these human HeLa cells.

5. This fluorescence micrograph of a HeLa cell shows the cytoskeletal microfilaments in red and nuclei stain with Hoechst in blue.

Give thanks everyday to Henrietta Lacks’ “Immortal Cells” — my molecular bio professor.

Having one degree in science, and another in healthcare, I have learned about HeLa cells in many a lecture hall. Doesn’t matter how many times and what I already know, though… the story of Henrietta Lacks and HeLa cells never gets old and is always so fascinating to me!

Originally Posted By neoteotihuacan

dearlambie:

neoteotihuacan:

A few months back, a small twitter hashtag got kind of crazy - #overlyhonestmethods

Its a hashtag full of scientists admitting shortcuts in research, along with the daily face palms and annoyances of a scientific lifestyle. Science is hard, yo. 

I decided to steal some of the more popular tweets from the trending hashtag along with some random images of scientists from Google image search and combine them. This is the result. it works, I think. 

The full album can be found here: http://imgur.com/a/x77kL

image

(via nurse-on-duty)

Originally Posted By ooksaidthelibrarian

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