Originally Posted By hannahmargaretillustrations

hannahmargaretillustrations:

Few of my favorite aspects of fall!
Watercolor

hannahmargaretillustrations:

Few of my favorite aspects of fall!

Watercolor

(via woolysmarts)

Originally Posted By coffeemuggermd

coffeemuggermd:

monday feels.

coffeemuggermd:

monday feels.

(via aspiringdoctors)

Originally Posted By dustjacketattic

dustjacketattic:

by alice gao

dustjacketattic:

by alice gao

(via remainsimple)

Originally Posted By copingnurse

When two nurses hate the same doctor…

copingnurse:

image

(via proveitmakemefightme)

Originally Posted By luna---belle

Originally Posted By design-is-fine

design-is-fine:

Dodel-Port Atlas, botanical wall chart Volvox Globator, a species of green algae. The images were drawn by husband and wife team of Arnold and Carolina Dodel-Port. Arnold was a Swiss botanist who began composing these images in 1878. McGregor Museum, University of Auckland

design-is-fine:

Dodel-Port Atlas, botanical wall chart Volvox Globator, a species of green algae. The images were drawn by husband and wife team of Arnold and Carolina Dodel-Port. Arnold was a Swiss botanist who began composing these images in 1878. McGregor Museum, University of Auckland

(via scientificillustration)

Originally Posted By peperomint

peperomint:

nail polish on fingernails: 2 days
nail polish on toenails: 200 years. ur ghost will have glittery toes. ur descendants will come out of the womb w/ revlon 791 midnight affair perfectly applied. infinite

Yes, I realize that everyone uses their hands and fingers more, but the staying power of nail polish on toenails really is remarkable.

(via omg-nowai)

Originally Posted By hanseofficial

medmonkey:

geekyamazon:

flawless

I can’t help but love this.

(Source: hanseofficial)

Originally Posted By kateoplis

kateoplis:

"The first thing I do is I dress for airports. I dress for security. I dress for the worst-case scenario. Comfortable shoes are important — I like Clarks desert boots because they go off and on very quickly, they’re super comfortable, you can beat the hell out of them, and they’re cheap.
In my carry-on, I’ll have a notebook, yellow legal pads, good headphones. Imodium is important. The necessity for Imodium will probably present itself, and you don’t want to be caught without it. I always carry a scrunchy lightweight down jacket; it can be a pillow if I need to sleep on a floor. And the iPad is essential. I load it up with books to be read, videos, films, games, apps, because I’m assuming there will be downtime. You can’t count on good films on an airplane. 
I check my luggage. I hate the people struggling to cram their luggage in an overhead bin, so I don’t want to be one of those people.
On the plane, I like to read fiction set in the location I’m going to. Fiction is in many ways more useful than a guidebook, because it gives you those little details, a sense of the way a place smells, an emotional sense of the place. So, I’ll bring Graham Greene’s The Quiet American if I’m going to Vietnam. It’s good to feel romantic about a destination before you arrive.” 
"I never, ever try to weasel upgrades. I’m one of those people who feel really embarrassed about wheedling. I never haggle over price. I sort of wander away out of shame when someone does that. I’m socially nonfunctional in those situations. 
I don’t get jet lag as long as I get my sleep. As tempting as it is to get really drunk on the plane, I avoid that. If you take a long flight and get off hungover and dehydrated, it’s a bad way to be. I’ll usually get on the plane, take a sleeping pill, and sleep through the whole flight. Then I’ll land and whatever’s necessary for me to sleep at bedtime in the new time zone, I’ll do that. 
There’s almost never a good reason to eat on a plane. You’ll never feel better after airplane food than before it. I don’t understand people who will accept every single meal on a long flight. I’m convinced it’s about breaking up the boredom. You’re much better off avoiding it. Much better to show up in a new place and be hungry and eat at even a little street stall than arrive gassy and bloated, full, flatulent, hungover. So I just avoid airplane food. It’s in no way helpful. 
For me, one of the great joys of traveling is good plumbing. A really good high-pressure shower, with an unlimited supply of hot water. It’s a major topic of discussion for me and my crew. Best-case scenario: a Japanese toilet. Those high-end Japanese toilets that sprinkle hot water in your ass. We take an almost unholy pleasure in that.”
"I’ve stopped buying souvenirs. The first few years I’d buy trinkets or T-shirts or handcrafts. I rarely do that anymore. My apartment is starting to look like Colonel Mustard’s club. So much of it comes out of the same factory in Taiwan.”
"The other great way to figure out where to eat in a new city is to provoke nerd fury online. Go to a number of foodie websites with discussion boards. Let’s say you’re going to Kuala Lumpur — just post on the Malaysia board that you recently returned and had the best rendang in the universe, and give the name of a place, and all these annoying foodies will bombard you with angry replies about how the place is bullshit, and give you a better place to go.”
Bourdain: How to Travel

kateoplis:

"The first thing I do is I dress for airports. I dress for security. I dress for the worst-case scenario. Comfortable shoes are important — I like Clarks desert boots because they go off and on very quickly, they’re super comfortable, you can beat the hell out of them, and they’re cheap.

In my carry-on, I’ll have a notebook, yellow legal pads, good headphones. Imodium is important. The necessity for Imodium will probably present itself, and you don’t want to be caught without it. I always carry a scrunchy lightweight down jacket; it can be a pillow if I need to sleep on a floor. And the iPad is essential. I load it up with books to be read, videos, films, games, apps, because I’m assuming there will be downtime. You can’t count on good films on an airplane. 

I check my luggage. I hate the people struggling to cram their luggage in an overhead bin, so I don’t want to be one of those people.

On the plane, I like to read fiction set in the location I’m going to. Fiction is in many ways more useful than a guidebook, because it gives you those little details, a sense of the way a place smells, an emotional sense of the place. So, I’ll bring Graham Greene’s The Quiet American if I’m going to Vietnam. It’s good to feel romantic about a destination before you arrive.” 

"I never, ever try to weasel upgrades. I’m one of those people who feel really embarrassed about wheedling. I never haggle over price. I sort of wander away out of shame when someone does that. I’m socially nonfunctional in those situations. 

I don’t get jet lag as long as I get my sleep. As tempting as it is to get really drunk on the plane, I avoid that. If you take a long flight and get off hungover and dehydrated, it’s a bad way to be. I’ll usually get on the plane, take a sleeping pill, and sleep through the whole flight. Then I’ll land and whatever’s necessary for me to sleep at bedtime in the new time zone, I’ll do that. 

There’s almost never a good reason to eat on a plane. You’ll never feel better after airplane food than before it. I don’t understand people who will accept every single meal on a long flight. I’m convinced it’s about breaking up the boredom. You’re much better off avoiding it. Much better to show up in a new place and be hungry and eat at even a little street stall than arrive gassy and bloated, full, flatulent, hungover. So I just avoid airplane food. It’s in no way helpful. 

For me, one of the great joys of traveling is good plumbing. A really good high-pressure shower, with an unlimited supply of hot water. It’s a major topic of discussion for me and my crew. Best-case scenario: a Japanese toilet. Those high-end Japanese toilets that sprinkle hot water in your ass. We take an almost unholy pleasure in that.”

"I’ve stopped buying souvenirs. The first few years I’d buy trinkets or T-shirts or handcrafts. I rarely do that anymore. My apartment is starting to look like Colonel Mustard’s club. So much of it comes out of the same factory in Taiwan.”

"The other great way to figure out where to eat in a new city is to provoke nerd fury online. Go to a number of foodie websites with discussion boards. Let’s say you’re going to Kuala Lumpur — just post on the Malaysia board that you recently returned and had the best rendang in the universe, and give the name of a place, and all these annoying foodies will bombard you with angry replies about how the place is bullshit, and give you a better place to go.”

Bourdain: How to Travel

(via missmdisme)

Originally Posted By introvertedbionerd

When people ask me why I drink so much coffee…..

introvertedbionerd:

image

(via caudaequina)

MOM’S 1ST BIRTHDAY ママも1歳、おめでとう。 | パンパース公式

(Source: youtube.com)

Originally Posted By surlywun

When the new resident keeps adding another order every 3 minutes instead of putting them all in at once…

surlywun:

image

Originally Posted By whiskeyandmisanthropy

whiskeyandmisanthropy:

Chin up, soldier on.

whiskeyandmisanthropy:

Chin up, soldier on.

Originally Posted By batpigandme

batpigandme:

If everyone could do this face, the word “no” would cease to exist. by piggyandpolly http://ift.tt/1DAssw8

So stinkin’ cute.

batpigandme:

If everyone could do this face, the word “no” would cease to exist. by piggyandpolly http://ift.tt/1DAssw8

So stinkin’ cute.

Originally Posted By mitthjerteblor

Where can I get my hands on this!?

Where can I get my hands on this!?

(Source: mitthjerteblor, via proveitmakemefightme)

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